October Art Week
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Shepherd W&K Galleries

SHEPHERD W&K GALLERIES

EUROPEAN PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, AND SCULPTURE

  Music, Zoran    Paysage vide, 1961     Paysage Vide is one of the paintings dating from around 1960 in which Zoran Music adhered most closely to an abstract pictorial language. Values like structure, atmosphere and monochromy clearly come to the fore and displace figurative elements from previous years. The majority of the picture is composed of a shimmering, muddy white field, accentuated by cloudy brown patches around the edges. It alternates between tactile and optical spatial qualities. One is reminded of Jean Dubuffet’s Matter Painting and also of the pulsating effects of Colour Field art. Music’s abstractions are always linked with landscape, usually from his homeland Dalmatia – stark, dry stretches of land and blazing light. In these abstract landscapes there is no horizon or true sense of depth in spite of their vibrating effects. Spirit and memory resonate through this abstract pictorial language; they are inner, mental spheres of nature and the homeland. ‘I hold my landscape within me, nothing essential has been added to it since childhood ... I enter into a dialogue with the landscape around me, discuss with and offer my inner life to it and it gives me a response that perhaps deepens or corrects what is already within me. Every landscape thus becomes a mirror of myself and responds to me like an echo.’ These mental landscapes are silent; they are released from the everyday.  Florian Steininger (Kunsthalle Krems)

Music, Zoran

Paysage vide, 1961

Paysage Vide is one of the paintings dating from around 1960 in which Zoran Music adhered most closely to an abstract pictorial language. Values like structure, atmosphere and monochromy clearly come to the fore and displace figurative elements from previous years. The majority of the picture is composed of a shimmering, muddy white field, accentuated by cloudy brown patches around the edges. It alternates between tactile and optical spatial qualities. One is reminded of Jean Dubuffet’s Matter Painting and also of the pulsating effects of Colour Field art. Music’s abstractions are always linked with landscape, usually from his homeland Dalmatia – stark, dry stretches of land and blazing light. In these abstract landscapes there is no horizon or true sense of depth in spite of their vibrating effects. Spirit and memory resonate through this abstract pictorial language; they are inner, mental spheres of nature and the homeland. ‘I hold my landscape within me, nothing essential has been added to it since childhood ... I enter into a dialogue with the landscape around me, discuss with and offer my inner life to it and it gives me a response that perhaps deepens or corrects what is already within me. Every landscape thus becomes a mirror of myself and responds to me like an echo.’ These mental landscapes are silent; they are released from the everyday.

Florian Steininger (Kunsthalle Krems)

Music, Zoran: Motivo Dalmata, 1952

In the painting 'Motivo Dalmata', a group of mounted shepherds in a rear view determines the picture, protected with dark parasols from the scorching sun, which floods the Dalmatian region with its glistening rays. Any realistic plasticity and three-dimensionality is abandoned in favour of surface density. Music builds the square in individual zones and paths. Shepherd, horse, mountain, earth and heaven are identical in their essence - pure painting. Nevertheless, Zoran Music remains attached to reality as a pretext for painting, distancing itself from the avant-garde that proclaimed abstraction at the time, whether in the USA Abstract Expressionism, or in Europe Informel. It was not until the end of the 1950s that the artist joined the abstract movement for a brief period, oriented towards the lyrical informal of the École de Paris. community all these pictures are characterized by calm, wordlessness, introspection - autobiographically: Music was deported to Dachau in 1944, where he documented the indescribable horror in shocking drawings. It was not until the 1970s that the artist incorporated these memories of the concentration camp into his artistic work. From gnarled twigs and karstified hills arise mountains of human beings of the killed victims. In the Dalmatian landscapes, music returns to the conflict-free romanticized phase of his childhood, the feeling of being at home lets him endure his traumas.


GALLERY EXHIBITION: Zoran Music

Organized by Shepherd W&K Galleries | OPENS OCTOBER 25, 2018

 

The Slovenian-Italian painter and graphic artist Zoran Music was born on 12 February 1909 in Bukovica near Gorizia in the then Austria-Hungary. He deals primarily with the barren landscapes of Dalmatia and Italy and, in contrast, with urban scenes from Paris and Venice. In addition there are portraits and everyday scenes of farmers and fishermen. In the years 1950/51 he was given many awards including the special prize from the Biennale in Venice. A contract with the Galerie de France in 1952 gave him the opportunity to live and work in Paris, although he kept his studio in Venice. His works became increasingly abstract. From 1956 to 1960 Music worked in Dalmatia and then in Cortina d’Ampezzo, near Bologna, on the Côte d’Azur and in the Dolomites.

 

CONTACT

58 East 79th Street

(212) 861-4050

shepherdny@aol.com

 Tuesday - Saturday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


The Vienna-based gallery Wienerroither & Kohlbacher specialises in modern art. It is well known for dealing in works on paper and unites the great Austrian artists around 1900 such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka, Alfred Kubin, Koloman Moser and Max Oppenheimer. Furthermore, the gallery offers artworks by international artists such as Lyonel Feininger, George Grosz, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and Emil Nolde, and Judit Reigl. Wienerroither & Kohlbacher participates in some of the most important international art fairs and salons
(such as TEFAF Maastricht and New York, Frieze Masters London, etc…) and is affiliated with Shepherd Gallery in New York, hence the name, Shepherd W & K Galleries.